Knights poised to pounce on stray Dogs

EXPERIENCE: James Graham.THE Newcastle Knights are closelymonitoring developments at Canterbury as speculation mounts that the Bulldogs will be forced into a wholesale player cull to be salary-cap compliant next season.
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The Bulldogs are widely accepted to be facing a roster crisis, amid reportsthey willneed to release a host of players if the NRL proceeds with plans to set a salary cap of $9.14 million for 2018.

If a cleanout is required, no club would appear better placed to capitalise than Newcastle, who have budgeted conservatively and are still looking for recruits to reinforce their squad for next year.

Knights coach Nathan Brown said in a radio interview at the weekend he still hopes to sign“four or five” new players before next season kicks off.

Newcastle’s priority isfront-rowers, and theyheld negotiations with Brisbane veteran Adam Blair at the weekend.

They have also been linked with Canterbury skipper James Graham, while they may be in a position to offer top dollar to David Klemmer, Aaron Woods and Kieran Foran should any or all of them become available.

Woods (Wests Tigers) and Foran (Warriors) have signed lucrative deals with the Bulldogs starting next year, but they have not yet been ratified by the NRL.

Klemmer was reported in June to have asked for a release from the final three years of his contract unless the Bulldogs were willing to upgrade his financial terms.

“We’re in discussions with a lot of different players at the moment and we’re certainly not in any rush,’’ Knights chief executive Matt Gidley said.

“At this point, we’re sitting back to see what transpires.

“If those sort of players [at the Bulldogs]become available –and that’s a massive ‘if’ –we’re in a position to go and have real conversations with them.

“We know the type of player we’re looking for and we’re expecting that there will continue to be movement right up until the start of next season.

“From our point of view, we believe we are well positioned and it’s a matter of considering our options and making the right choices.”

Newcastle have already signed North Queensland fullback Kalyn Ponga, Sydney Roosters duo Aidan Guerra and Connor Watson and Brisbane pair Herman Ese’ese and Tautau Moga.

Former Kiwi Test winger Shaun Kenny-Dowall joined Newcastle before the June 30 transfer deadline.

There was speculation on Monday that Ponga was having second thoughts, after reportedly attracting interest from rugby union, but Gidley hadno reason to doubt the teenager would honour his four-year contract with the Knights.

Owls try new vintage

CLASSIC TASTE: Newcastle indie stalwarts The Owls have followed their passion for the Beatles and The Kinks on their new EP Rainy Day.OWLS frontman Josh Bailey isn’t fondofthat most ambiguous of musical terms, rock’n’roll.
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Instead he prefers “classic” or “vintage.” That was exactly the sound the Newcastle indie five-piece were strivingfor on their newEP Rainy Day.

Despite the title, Rainy Day sounds like The Owls’ at their summery best, with the five tracks filled with psychedelic guitar grooves and bright harmonies.

It’s a decided step away from the more Queens Of The Stone Age desert-rock sound, which dominatedtheir 2014 release Own The Streets.

“The band’s evolved a lot and the sound’s naturally gone this way, because that’s where we want to take it creatively,” Bailey said.“We’re really pushing that real classic English style, which we really dig.”

The Owls – Don’t Waste Your Time (On A Rainy Day)Vintage style is also visually present in The Owls’ two videos to promote the EP, Jesus Let Me Fly and the latest singleDon’t Waste Your Time (On a Rainy Day). The latter video has Newcastle looking like Venice Beach circa 1975.

“It makes Newcastle look really cool doesn’t it,” Bailey said.“It was done by a guy David Fulham and he’s really good with cinematography. He was able to really capture thesong’s vibe in a classic way.”

Rainy Day is the first of two EPs The Owls are expected to release in the next year. But after the record was delayed following the theft of audio files on a hard drive and by the band’s own strict quality control, Baileyisn’t making concrete plans.

“We’ve got about 20 to 30 demos, but we’re so critical and very slow in what we want to bring out,” he said.“It sometimes could be detrimental as we think about it too much.”

The Owls launch Rainy Day at the Cambridge Hotel on October 7.

MAC IN PORT MAC HEADLINE ACT: Meg Mac will perform at Port Macquarie’s Festival Of The Sun.

IF you missed out on tickets for Meg Mac’s sold-out debut show in Newcastle at the Cambridge Hotel on September 23 then you better driveto Port Macquarie in December.

Mac willheadline the 14thFestival Of The Sun alongside Brisbane indie bandBall Park Music, hip-hop duo Horrorshow and 80s pop-rock revivalists The Preatures.

Rounding out FOTSUNisHoly Holy, Kim Churchill, Bad//Dreems, Sampa the Great, The Bennies, Ali Barter, Ivan Ooze, The Cactus Channel, Dear Seattle, Press Club, Maddy Jane, Betty and Oswald andWharves.Tickets for the December 7 to 9 festival go on sale August 31 at 10am.

LIGHT UP FOLKFROM all reports the inaugural Lighthouse Folk Festival at Norah Head last year was a raging success. Who can argue with Paul Kelly and Charlie Owen on a balmy evening with a beautiful coastal backdrop?

Organisers have delivered a more-rounded line-up for the return to Norah Head, headlined by Hunters & Collectors’ Mark Seymour and his other band The Undertow.

Joining Seymour at the November 18 festival will be in-demand Rockhampton roots duo Busby Marou and melodic female foursome All Our Exes Live In Texas.

Also on the bill are American songwriters Fraser A. Gorman and Karl S. Williams andthe Central Coast’s Eagle & The Wolf,MañanaandLittle Quirks.

ORWELLIAN DEBUT DEBUT: Chicago garage band The Orwells begin their Australian tour at the Small Ballroom on September 21.

NEWCASTLE will be the first in the country to hear Chicago garage rockers The Orwells in the flesh when they launch their debut Australian tour at the Small Ballroom on September 21.

The Orwells burst onto the scene with their obvious Strokes and Black Lips influences when they appeared on The David Letterman Show in 2014 to perform their breakthrough single Who Needs You.

The bratty five-piece, who have earned a reputation for laddish behaviour, have previously supported The Arctic Monkeys and later this year they’ll tour with ThePixies and Weezer.

InFebruary The Orwells released their third album Terrible Human Beings.

MAKING WAVESTHAT rising finger-picking intro on Dean Lewis’ Waves is one of the most emotive pop openings this year. The song, which peaked at No.12 on the ARIA charts, made Lewis a break-out star.

Fresh from his first national tour, the Sydney indie-folk songwriter will play48 Watt Street on November 30to promote his new single Lose My Mind off his debut EP Same Kind Of Different.

FRESH DYER SWEET: Melanie Dyer’s brand of pop-country has been compared to early Taylor Swift.

EMERGING Australian pop-country starlet Melanie Dyer is dropping into Lizotte’s on September 14 to showcase songs off her debut album Fresh, which is released on Friday.

Dyer was knocked back on The Voice three years ago and has since made the judges rue their decision through her singles Fresh and Save My Cents.

CHASE CONTINUESTHAT long-awaited countdown to Chase The Sun’s third record continues, with the blues-rockers heading out on the road to promote their latest single Ain’t No Love.

It’s the second single off the yet-to-be-named third record, which follows 2010’s Rednecks & Gentlemen.Chase The Sun playthe Stag and Hunter Hotel on September 2.

Waaxing lyrical about pain

BRIGHT FUTURE: Brisbane band Waax and charismatic singer Marie De Vita (centre) have created a buzz with their second EP Wild & Weak.WAAX guitarist ChrisAntolak admits the emotional power of frontwoman Marie De Vita’s lyrics did not immediately dawn on the rest of the band during the making of their EP Wild & Weak.
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The Brisbane punk-garage five-piece weretoo consumed with the task of completing their second EP.

But once De Vitaopened up about the content of the lyrics, whicharticulated achronological account of her battle withmental illness, Antolak said the band were blown away.

“It’s pretty personal stuff, but the record is almost there for people if they’re in the same place,” Antolak said.

“It’s theircry for help, so people can relate to it and see you don’t have to hold these things in if you’re going through troubles or a depressive state, you can talk about it and find help.

“It wasn’t so daunting to us, because we felt like these things need to be talked about and they shouldn’t have astigma attached to them, it’s about depression and mental health.”

It wasn’t like Waax were unaware that their charismatic singer, who has been compared The Yeah Yeah Yeahs’ Karen O, was struggling.

“It was a pretty traumatic experience for Marie to be going through this self-discovery,” Antolak said.

“It was pretty hard on her, so we’d see it and try and support her as much as we could.

“I feel like she’s really come golden out of it, because she’s put it all inside the songs, so it’s almost like there’s nothing else to be said about it.”

Out of De Vita’s pain has bloomedan energetic,raw andmelodicrecord. Wild & Weak’s title track and other single Same Same have attracted major airplay and announced Waax as possibly the next great band to spring from Brisbane’s fertile punk scene, that’s spawned Violent Soho and Dune Rats.

Waax formed in 2013 and released their debut EP Holy Sick in 2015.

Later that year Antolak and bassist Tom Griffin joined, movingWAAX’s sound from lo-fi garage into a more angular post-punk direction.

Waax headline the firstNo-Fi Fridayat the Cambridge Hotel on September 1 with local acts Fritz, Voodoo Youth and Belle Badi.

Dutchy’s family face Teo cancer surgery dilemma

Dutchy’s family face Teo cancer surgery dilemma BATTLING: Robert Holland, centre, after being awarded life membership of the Lord’s Taverners in Newcastle last month. Picture: Simone De Peak
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Dutchy Holland celebrating his first Test wicket with wicketkeeper Wayne Phillips.

HAPPIER TIMES: Carolyn gives Robert a congratulatory kiss after he was named in the 1985 Ashes touring squad, two days after NSW won the Sheffield Shield final.

LOYAL SERVANT: Robert Holland batting for the Hunter Lord’s Taverners against a Central Coast side in 2011 at Awaba Oval. Picture: Ryan Osland

Celebrating a wicket for NSW against WA.

Holland dismisses Indian great Sunil Gavaskar caught and bowled while playing for Northern at No.1 Sportsground in 1978.

Holland with Murray Bennett in 1985.

TweetFacebookHerald that the family were now confronted with a heart-wrenching choice.

“Steve sent Dad a text and phoned Dad to see whether he was interested in seeing Charlie Teo,” Craig said.

“They’ve been down to see him and we’re just sort of weighing up the pros and cons of all of that.It’s really tricky, unknown sort of stuff.

“He’s [Teo] willing to take the risk where others aren’t.

“I haven’t looked at what his success rates are, but not everyone comes out saved.

“We just don’t know. It’s such a hard decision.

“There’s other factors that come into it, his age, more time under anesthesia.”

Carolyn Holland gives her husband a congratulatory kiss after he was named in the 1985 Ashes squad.

Holland, 70, had radiation treatment and chemotherapy after his initial surgery and has now started a course of Avastin, an expensive drug not included on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, after his children set up an online crowd-funding page.

Craig said his father was more lucid since ending his chemotherapy treatment.

“He has his good and bad days. They’ve taken him off the chemo and we’ve started the new medication. He’s had a week on that.

“We’re just waiting to see how this new drug goes.

“I was with him this morning and he was having a conversation with me. Not the old Dad, but a lot better than what he was.”

The Hollands are also facing a court case on November 6, when a Lake Macquarie couple will stand trial forallegedly robbing and bashing Robert and his wife, Carolyn, last year.

Meanwhile, some of Holland’s former clubmates at Toronto, formerly Southern Lakes, have organised a fundraising night and reunion at Toronto Workers Club on Friday, September 15.

Holland is a life member and former president of the club and was awarded an Order of Australia Medal in January after decades of service to the sport as a player, coach and administrator.

To donate to the online campaign, visitmycause南京夜网419论坛 and search for Robert Holland.

Weird purple bikes at Warners Bay send us a bit loopyPHOTOS

Weird purple bikes at Warners Bay send us a bit loopy | PHOTOS A purple bike in King Street at Warners Bay.
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Another purple bike at Warners Bay – this time on John Street, next to Coles.

Strange: A purple bike on The Esplanade at Warners Bay. Picture: Jonathan Carroll.

TweetFacebookPrint’s Not DeadSpeaking of bikes, Glendale’s Donna Norris saidthe Herald, andother newspapers for that matter, were oftenused to keep bikers warm when caught in cold weatheron a trip.

Tucking the paper down the front of their shirts helped stop the cold from “cutting through to the bone”.

We don’t doubt it. We’ve seen that done in the Tour de France.

Donna’s tidbit followed ourstory on Saturday about the Herald once being used for shin padsduring a women’s rugby league game in 1972 at Kentish Oval inLambton.

Andwho said print was dead? With this sort of added value, print will be around for ages.

Wood-fire heaters suckHas anybody else had a gutful (and a lungful) of wood-fire heaters spewing out their toxic pollutants into the winter air?

Wood-fire heaters pollute the air and get inside houses through cracks.

It smells like our streets are lined with hundreds of cigarette smokers. And this week’s temperature inversion makes it worse,especially for asthmatics.

How sad it is that we can’t go outside and breathe in a nice big refreshing and invigorating gulp of fresh winter air in our neighbourhoods.

The CSIRO has estimatedthat the average new wood heater emits more particulates per evening than5000 cigarettes.

Some have dubbedfine particulate matter in wood smoke as “the new asbestos”.

At a 2013Senate inquiry, the NSW EPA said wood smoke could cost the state about $8 billion in extra health costs by 2030.

The committee that held the inquiry called for strict new standards for wood-fire heaters…blah, blah, blah. Topics says ban ‘em. But we know that’ll never happen because the industry would complain too much and governments tend to be moronic.

As for the people using wood-fire heaters, why do you need ‘em for? It’s not like we’re living inSiberia. Yeah electricity is expensive, but do you need a fire blaring and smouldering for hours?Just stick a bar heater on for a weebit to take the chill off the air and Bob’s your uncle.

* [email protected]南京夜网419论坛

Dutchy’s family face Teo cancer surgery dilemma

Dutchy’s family face Teo cancer surgery dilemma BATTLING: Robert Holland, centre, after being awarded life membership of the Lord’s Taverners in Newcastle last month. Picture: Simone De Peak
Nanjing Night Net

Dutchy Holland celebrating his first Test wicket with wicketkeeper Wayne Phillips.

HAPPIER TIMES: Carolyn gives Robert a congratulatory kiss after he was named in the 1985 Ashes touring squad, two days after NSW won the Sheffield Shield final.

LOYAL SERVANT: Robert Holland batting for the Hunter Lord’s Taverners against a Central Coast side in 2011 at Awaba Oval. Picture: Ryan Osland

Celebrating a wicket for NSW against WA.

Holland dismisses Indian great Sunil Gavaskar caught and bowled while playing for Northern at No.1 Sportsground in 1978.

Holland with Murray Bennett in 1985.

TweetFacebookHerald that the family were now confronted with a heart-wrenching choice.

“Steve sent Dad a text and phoned Dad to see whether he was interested in seeing Charlie Teo,” Craig said.

“They’ve been down to see him and we’re just sort of weighing up the pros and cons of all of that.It’s really tricky, unknown sort of stuff.

“He’s [Teo] willing to take the risk where others aren’t.

“I haven’t looked at what his success rates are, but not everyone comes out saved.

“We just don’t know. It’s such a hard decision.

“There’s other factors that come into it, his age, more time under anesthesia.”

Carolyn Holland gives her husband a congratulatory kiss after he was named in the 1985 Ashes squad.

Holland, 70, had radiation treatment and chemotherapy after his initial surgery and has now started a course of Avastin, an expensive drug not included on the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme, after his children set up an online crowd-funding page.

Craig said his father was more lucid since ending his chemotherapy treatment.

“He has his good and bad days. They’ve taken him off the chemo and we’ve started the new medication. He’s had a week on that.

“We’re just waiting to see how this new drug goes.

“I was with him this morning and he was having a conversation with me. Not the old Dad, but a lot better than what he was.”

The Hollands are also facing a court case on November 6, when a Lake Macquarie couple will stand trial forallegedly robbing and bashing Robert and his wife, Carolyn, last year.

Meanwhile, some of Holland’s former clubmates at Toronto, formerly Southern Lakes, have organised a fundraising night and reunion at Toronto Workers Club on Friday, September 15.

Holland is a life member and former president of the club and was awarded an Order of Australia Medal in January after decades of service to the sport as a player, coach and administrator.

To donate to the online campaign, visitmycause南京夜网419论坛 and search for Robert Holland.